Friday, May 15, 2015

 
Friday,  May 15


  We are now at 105,000 people who have fled Burundi.  (I'd like to make that number jump by two!)  Sadly, from the news reports it appears the coup has failed.  Very bad news.  That seemed to be the quickest way to peace.  Now I don't know what lies ahead for the good people of Burundi.

     We saw on the news last night a story about a wounded man in the hospital.  I assume this man was not one fighting FOR the president because a group of police broke into the hospital and gunned him down.  Does that sound even vaguely legal to you?  And these are the men in charge of law and order here.

     The Van Wagoner's came to the Martha Hotel yesterday so we could all be together when the word comes to go.

     We are assessing info on the airport and the borders.  We wanted to head out for the Rwandan border, but the Southeast area presidency asked that we stay put.

     Here is an alert we received yesterday from the US Embassy:

May 14, 2015 - Travel Warning

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens against all travel to Burundi and recommends that U.S. citizens currently in Burundi depart as soon as it is feasible to do so.  As a result of the deteriorating security situation, the Department of State ordered the departure of dependents of U.S. government personnel and non-emergency U.S. government personnel from Burundi on May 14. The U.S. Embassy is able to offer only very limited emergency services to U.S. citizens in Burundi. This Travel Warning supersedes the Travel Warning issued on May 11, 2015.

The security situation remains fluid and volatile because of military and security forces activity in Bujumbura.  There have been increased political tensions and civil disturbances related to these actions.  Airport and land borders are reportedly closed.  U.S. citizens should shelter in place until it is safe to move about, ensure that your travel documents are up-to-date, and confirm that air and land borders are open before attempting to depart the country. 

The terrorist organization al-Shabaab, based in Somalia, has threatened to conduct terror attacks in Burundi.  It may also target U.S. interests in Burundi.  Political violence persists throughout Burundi, a carryover of the Burundian civil war. Armed groups operate in Burundi.  Weapons are easy to obtain and some ex-combatants have turned to crime or political violence.  Crime, often committed by groups of armed bandits or street children, poses the highest risk for foreign visitors.  Exchanges of gunfire and grenade attacks have increased but are usually not directed at foreigners.  If you encounter such a situation, stay indoors in a ground floor interior room away from doors and windows.  Common crimes include muggings, burglaries, and robberies.  U.S. government personnel are prohibited from walking on the streets after dark and from using local public transportation at any time.  Local authorities in any part of Burundi are often unable to provide timely assistance during an emergency.

Demonstrations, gatherings, and even sporting events that are intended to be peaceful can turn violent without advance warning.  For this reason, U.S. citizens should routinely monitor local media sources and the Internet for reports of demonstrations and unrest, and avoid political rallies, demonstrations, and crowds of any kind.

Travel outside the capital, Bujumbura, presents significant risks, especially after nightfall.  Note the U.S. embassy limits and monitors the travel of its personnel in Burundi.  All movement by embassy employees outside the city from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m. is prohibited.  Likewise, U.S. citizens should not travel on national highways from dusk to dawn.  Armed criminals ambush vehicles, particularly on the roads leading out of Bujumbura.  Keep vehicle doors locked and windows up when stopped in heavy traffic.

Corruption is endemic in Burundi and contributes to an environment where the rule of law is not respected.  Government officials may ask for bribes for providing routine services.  Travelers are frequently stopped, questioned, and asked for bribes by security forces at numerous official and unofficial roadblocks throughout the country.  Likewise, criminals who have paid off local officials may operate with impunity.


1 comment:

  1. We continue to pray for and worry about you, as well as all of our Burundian dear ones. We can hardly concentrate on anything else and are anxious to hear that you have safely evacuated, as we know all who know you are. We spent 3 weeks in JoBurg after our evacuation from Kinshasa and it was a challenge, but evacuation is better than staying. We pray for you to find a way to get out of there.
    We got an email from Frere Minos today. It sounds like they are laying low and helping each other to have the needed things to stay inside and be safe. Our prayers are with you all!

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